• Monitoring the request execution

    I wrote a small select that helps me troubleshoot the concurrent processing. The goal is to quickly understand which concurrent requests are executing at the moment and which ones are still in the queue. It’s also very important to get some basic information about running requests to start troubleshooting quickly after a problem is spotted, so the important information is: which concurrent node and which DB node are the request processes running on, what are the process IDs and what is the DB session doing.

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  • Java plugin instead of Jinitiator on 64-bit Windows

    Just a few days ago I started using Windows Vista x64 on my PC and today I found that there are serious problems running eBS forms using Jinitiator on this OS. Installation of Jinitiator 1.8.1.x fails with “Unsupported 16-Bit Application” error.

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  • Updated: WF Mailer setup for a dev/test environment

    There is a lot of Oracle e-Business Suite installations that use workflow mailer to communicate messages to users and many of these environments have clones for development and testing purposes. It’s obvious in most cases people that actually use the system will not be the same that develop customizations or do testing, therefore we need to reconfigure the workflow mailer to avoid sending misleading messages to business users from development or test environments.

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  • Concurrent request scheduling explained

    It’s quite an interesting way that’s used to implement concurrent request schedules in Oracle Applications. In this post I’ll describe how “Periodic” and “On Specific Day” type of schedules are stored in the Database and if you will be patient enough to read all the story, I’ll give you a query that can be used to report all the request schedules in the environment.

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  • Concurrent Manager internals (Part 2)

    This is the continuation of Concurrent Manager internals (Part 1), where I described how concurrent manager selects a list of requests that have to be run. It was also discovered, that there is no special queue of requests for each concurrent manager and that there are some settings that are obtained only at the time of startup of a concurrent manager. At the moment it is clear that all the processes of the same concurrent manager (e.g. Standard Manager) use the same select to query the requests for execution, therefore it is possible that more than one concurrent manager process will have the same request_id’s to run. In this post I’ll describe the mechanism that’s used to assign the request to a particular concurrent manager process.

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